Recent Posts

New stable release: GRASS GIS 7.0.0

The GRASS GIS Development team has announced the release of the new major version GRASS GIS 7.0.0. This version provides many new functionalities including spatio-temporal database support, image segmentation, estimation of evapotranspiration and emissivity from satellite imagery, automatic line vertex densification during reprojection, more LIDAR support and a strongly improved graphical user interface experience. GRASS GIS 7.0.0 also offers significantly improved performance for many raster and vector modules: “Many processes that would take hours now take less than a minute, even on my small laptop!” explains Markus Neteler, the coordinator of the development team composed of academics and GIS professionals from around the world. The software is available for Linux, MS-Windows, Mac OSX and other operating systems.NagsHead

Detailed announcement and software download:

http://grass.osgeo.org/news/42/15/GRASS-GIS-7-0-0/

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (http://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

Batch Geonews: Google Working with Esri, ArcGIS Pro Released, Turf 1.4.0 Released, Facebook using iBeacons, and much more

Here’s the recent geonews in batch mode.

On the open source / open data front:

On the Esri front:

On the Google front:

Discussed over Slashdot:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

OpenStreetMap Gets Routing on its Main Website

It has been possible to get driving directions from OpenStreetMap data for quite a while, but what’s new and major is the capability to get directions directly from OpenStreetMap.org, meaning more competition to Google Maps and similar services. This is also discussed over Slashdot.

From the announcement: “Well, the first thing to note is that the philosophy of OpenStreetMap is not to offer a one-stop-shop on our main website, but to create truly open data to empower others to do great things with it. So there has already been fantastic OSM-based travel routing for many years, on excellent websites such as OSRM, Mapquest, Graphhopper, Cyclestreets, Komoot, cycle.travel… the list goes on and on. But all of those things are on other websites and apps, so people don’t always realise that OpenStreetMap has this power. What this latest development has done is really neat: the OSM website offers directions which are actually provided by third-party systems, but they are included in the main site via some crafty JavaScript coding. So as well as being really handy in itself to have directions available, it helps “first glancers” to see all the things they can do with OSM.”

openstreetmap-routing

Cartoview Enterprise GeoSpatial Application Platform Released

Cartoview is an open source web framework for managing and deploying  geospatial and business Applications, the architecture of Cartoview makes it easy to efficiently develop and maintain and deploy GIS enterprise applications. The Cartoview App market offers a variety of apps that are simply deployed directly from the browser, the apps allow you to easily handle your spatial data under ESRI and OGC standards, create maps, interact with users and manage your business. Use Cartoview to manage and publish your geospatial data, host your mapping applications, integrate with the ArcGIS platform and much more.

Cartoview covers and serves local government , state government , emergency management , crisis mapping , business management , road safety , citizen engagement and much more solutions. The metadata management through cartoview supports INSPIRE , CSW and OGC standards. Cartoview is licensed under the Apache License Version 2.0 which grants you the right to customize, extend, modify, repackage, resell, and many other potential uses of the system. 

For further details you can find more at Cartoview website  and NYC demo.

 

10 Years of Google Maps, Google Earth Pro Features and other Google-related Geonews

It’s obvious to anyone in the geospatial industry that Google Maps brought a wind of fresh air. They were not the first ones (e.g. OGC’s WMS standard exists since 1999) and MapQuest was popular at the time, but Google successfully increased global access to interactive maps thanks to Google Maps and Google Earth. Google Maps turned 10 years old and the official Google LatLong blog offers a summary of its milestones.

From the official entry: “[…] before 2005, you’d remember the days when we were all dependent on paper maps, print-outs, post-its and sometimes even a compass for directions! Getting from point A to B is something we do all day, every day—from finding the fastest way to get to work, to dropping the kids off on a carpool route, to meeting friends for drinks at a new spot—so it should be as easy as possible.”

Other geospatial-related Google news: