Recent Posts

Batch Geonews: QGIS News, GeoWave, New Google Roads API, Challenges of Geospatial Databases, and much more

Here’s the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

Discussed over Slashdot:

In the everything-else category:

In the maps category:

QGIS 2.8 LTR Released

Releases of the popular open source desktop GIS software QGIS are always good news, and it is now at version QGIS 2.8 LTR.

LTR what? “LTR stands for “Long Term Release”. This means that QGIS now has a system in place to provide a one-year stable release with backported bug fixes. The idea behind LTR is to have a stable platform for enterprises and organizations that don’t want update their software and training materials more often than once a year.”

Here’s the official visual changelog and its table of content:

New stable release: GRASS GIS 7.0.0

The GRASS GIS Development team has announced the release of the new major version GRASS GIS 7.0.0. This version provides many new functionalities including spatio-temporal database support, image segmentation, estimation of evapotranspiration and emissivity from satellite imagery, automatic line vertex densification during reprojection, more LIDAR support and a strongly improved graphical user interface experience. GRASS GIS 7.0.0 also offers significantly improved performance for many raster and vector modules: “Many processes that would take hours now take less than a minute, even on my small laptop!” explains Markus Neteler, the coordinator of the development team composed of academics and GIS professionals from around the world. The software is available for Linux, MS-Windows, Mac OSX and other operating systems.NagsHead

Detailed announcement and software download:

http://grass.osgeo.org/news/42/15/GRASS-GIS-7-0-0/

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (http://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

Batch Geonews: Google Working with Esri, ArcGIS Pro Released, Turf 1.4.0 Released, Facebook using iBeacons, and much more

Here’s the recent geonews in batch mode.

On the open source / open data front:

On the Esri front:

On the Google front:

Discussed over Slashdot:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

OpenStreetMap Gets Routing on its Main Website

It has been possible to get driving directions from OpenStreetMap data for quite a while, but what’s new and major is the capability to get directions directly from OpenStreetMap.org, meaning more competition to Google Maps and similar services. This is also discussed over Slashdot.

From the announcement: “Well, the first thing to note is that the philosophy of OpenStreetMap is not to offer a one-stop-shop on our main website, but to create truly open data to empower others to do great things with it. So there has already been fantastic OSM-based travel routing for many years, on excellent websites such as OSRM, Mapquest, Graphhopper, Cyclestreets, Komoot, cycle.travel… the list goes on and on. But all of those things are on other websites and apps, so people don’t always realise that OpenStreetMap has this power. What this latest development has done is really neat: the OSM website offers directions which are actually provided by third-party systems, but they are included in the main site via some crafty JavaScript coding. So as well as being really handy in itself to have directions available, it helps “first glancers” to see all the things they can do with OSM.”

openstreetmap-routing