Recent Posts

Batch Geonews: Centimeters GNSS Accuracy from Smartphones, Google Maps + StreetView in Legos, Google Earth in VR, and much more

Here’s the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

Discussed over Slashdot:

In the everything-else category:

In the maps category:

OpenLayers 3.5.0 Released

The popular open source web mapping library OpenLayers 3.5.0 has been released.

Some of the new features according to the official blog: “Among the features in this release is a new snapping interaction. This can be used in conjunction with the draw and modify interactions to allow vector editing with snapping support. See the new snap example for a demonstration of its use. Adding to OpenLayers’ already excellent vector rendering and editing support, the Canvas renderer now supports a wrapX property on vector sources. Those in the mapping world have long known that the world is flat. But it is less common to accept that our flat world only has north and south edges while extending infinitely east and west. The wrapX property on vector sources (true by default) indicates that features will be rendered repeatedly as users pan east or west of the dateline. As if snapping and wrapping weren’t enough new vector functionality, the draw interaction now supports freehand drawing.  […] While we stand in allegiance with GeoJSON, you can now build support for Esri JSON into your applications. This adds to the already extensive feature format support of GeoJSON, GML, GPX, IGC, KML, Encoded Polyline, TopoJSON, and WKT.”

GeoNetwork OpenSource 3.0.0 Released

The popular geographic metadata catalog software GeoNetwork OpenSource just released version 3.0.0.

A reminder of what it is: “GeoNetwork is a catalog application to manage spatially referenced resources. It provides powerful metadata editing and search functions as well as an interactive web map viewer. It is currently used in numerous Spatial Data Infrastructure initiatives across the world.” Amongst the long list of new features:

OpenStreetMap to the Rescue: 2015 Nepal Earthquake

While we quickly tweeted OpenStreetMap efforts regarding the crisis in Nepal, we haven’t posted on the blog yet, which we now do! There are numerous places where you’ll find info and status reports, but I suspect the best place to start is with the 2015 Nepal earthquake OpenStreetMap wiki page.

From the page: “Our goal is to contribute to humanitarian relief by rapidly providing a detailed and accurate map (i.e., road network, villages, buildings, etc.) to support the humanitarian organizations. These services help locate people at risk efficiently, and facilitate the delivery of goods and services to remote areas. OSM Tasking Manager to coordinate the mapping by the contributors.” The following image is taken from a MapBox entry providing some numbers on user contributions on OpenStreetMap in the first few days; “more than 2000 mappers have recorded 13,199 new miles of roads and 110,681 new buildings”. Open collaboration works!

New Scientific Journal: Open Geospatial Data, Software and Standards

Thanks to Between the Poles I learned about the new SpringerOpen journal named ‘Open Geospatial Data, Software and Standards’. Its content is published under a Creative Commons license (CC-BY).

The aims and scope: “Open Geospatial Data, Software and Standards provides an advanced forum for the science and technology of open data, crowdsourced information, and sensor web through the publication of reviews and regular research papers. The journal publishes articles that address issues related, but not limited to, the analysis and processing of open geo-data, standardization and interoperability of open geo-data and services, as well as applications based on open geo-data. The journal is also meant to be a space for theories, methods and applications related to crowdsourcing, volunteered geographic information, as well as Sensor Web and related topics.”