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Wikitude: Practical Augmented Reality for Android

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Ed Parsons discusses Mobilizy’s Wikitude app for Google’s Android phone platform. The short 1-minute video gives an excellent idea of it’s potential. From the official website: “Wikitude is a mobile travel guide for the Android platform based on location-based Wikipedia content. […] The truly compelling feature is the augmented reality cam view, users may hold the phone’s camera against a spectacular mountain range and see the names and heights displayed as overlay mapped with the mountains in the camera. Users may look out of an airplane window to see what is down there. Users may walk through a city like Seville, Spain, holding the phone’s camera against a building and Wikitude tells what it is.

Some Android related stories below.

Virtual Earth Imagery Update for October 2008: 41 Terabytes

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Microsoft announced the Virtual Earth October imagery update: 41,07TB of new data [several screenshots included]. Amongst the countries covered by new orthos or bird’s eye obliques: Spain, Japan, United States, Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, Luxembourg.

Support for ESRI Geodatabases Outside the ESRI Stack

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Two geoblog entries offer a nice discussion about supporting ESRI’s Geodatabase format outside the ESRI stack and how a File Geodatabase can be shared efficiently.

From the former entry: “After a bit of confusion as to why we would want to load the data into another application the answer was that we needed to use the “interoperability extension tool“, although it would make a lot more sense to use ArcGIS Server and expose the data as a web service through it.

Both are very clever ways to sell more ESRI product and there is nothing wrong with that – it pays the rent. It does create a bit of a conundrum as to what is the best way to support data portability for traditional GIS data outside of shapefile support. Digging through the ESRI online help there is the suggestion of using “geodatabase XML” which has an open specification. It looks promising, but I’m just not so sure many users are going to dig through a 46 page specification to make their data portable.

See also the very pertinent and related previous stories below.

Upload Google Maps Search Results to a GPS

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The Free Geography Tools shares a nice tip about a Google Maps feature to upload Google Maps search results to a GPS device (with screenshots).

From the entry: “Just found out about this feature recently: if you enter a location into the search box in Google Maps, you can download the result as a waypoint directly to some GPS systems, including Garmin and TomTom. After you get a search result in Google Maps, click on the “Send” link in the upper left […] You’ll get a box that comes up with the default to email the map link, but there are additional links for Car and GPS […]

Maps of the U.S. 2008 Presidential Election Results

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A few geoblogs entries discuss the results of the U.S. presidential election that will put Barack Obama as president next January. There’s clever elephant discussing the delta map of the New York Times: “One of the things I found curious about the numbers in the paper today is that while Obama won a strong Electoral College victory, his popular vote share is not much different from the share Bush won in 2004, and Bush won a squeaker in the Electoral College. The map tells the tale. McCain didn’t lose support across the board, he actually improved on Bush in places, but mostly in places where the Republicans were already winning smashing majorities – more votes in Alabama don’t get you any closer to the Presidency. So a respectable showing in the popular vote translates into an Electoral College whomping.

Spatial Sustain shares a rather weird-looking cartogram and The Map Room shares other cartograms.

Map Hawk discuss the USA Today’s “Behind the Results” map.

GeoMusings discuss the problems with red-blue binary maps.

See also the round up before the election.