Recent Posts

Google Earth for the iPhone Released!

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The Google Earth blog brings us news about this : “At long last, Google is releasing Google Earth for the iPhone (and iTouch) tonight! I’ve been expecting this to happen for months. Especially after I saw another Google Earth-like application on the iPhone back in May. Apparently some folks in Australia and Japan have already downloaded Google Earth for the iPhone. CNET has an initial review – and it looks fantastic. I quickly managed to download it – see my updated review below (the app is great!). You can click here to download GE for the iPhone from the iTunes app store. Or you can search the app store from your iPhone.”
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Various APB Recent Entries

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Here’s various interesting and recent All Points Blog entries that somehow did not find their way to our main page.

First there’s Intergraph being potentially #1 in GIS, beating ESRI in terms of revenue.

There’s deCarta announcing an API for the iPhone.

There’s the beginning of the end for portable navigation devices (PND).

And finally, The Guardian now using GeoRSS.

Do It Yourself GPS Jammer and GPS Shield

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We discussed GPS spoofing, but never GPS signal jamming. A Slashdot story made me aware of this do it yourself open source GPS jammer named Wave Bubble and the DIY GPS Shield.

For the Wave Bubble: “This website details the design and construction Wave Bubble: a self-tuning, wide-bandwidth portable RF jammer. The device is lightweight and small for easy camouflaging: it is the size of a pack of cigarettes.

An internal lithium-ion battery provides up to 2 hours of jamming (two bands, such as cell) or 4 hours (single band, such as cordless phone, GPS, WiFi, bluetooth, etc). The battery is rechargeable via a mini-USB connector or 4mm DC jack (a common size). Alternately, 3 AAA batteries may also be used.

First country to be fully mapped in 3D

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It appears that ~2.5 million buildings in Denmark are modeled in 3D. This claims to be the whole country and also the first to do so. From the Sharp GIS blog : “The modeling is mostly based on LIDAR data. I’ve seen several attempts to do this, but they have always resulted in either ugly or oversimplified buildings with flat roofs, or even worse made up of so many redundant points that no PC were able to show more than a few buildings at a time. This is the first fully automated attempt I’ve seen that comes out with a convincing result, and the scale of this is breathtaking. Considering they also have full terrain and surface model coverage, full high resolution ortho imagery coverage and lots of Pictometry (Birds Eye) imagery they can drape onto the facades, this makes for an impressive 3D model.”

Google Introduces Reverse Geocoding

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Google announced reserve geocoding for the API.

From the announcement: “Now, let me introduce the more advanced topic of reverse geocoding: the process of converting a latitude/longitude pair into an address. A much smaller (but important) percentage of developers will want to use a reverse geocoder to let their map users know the address for a particular point on the map, perhaps to help them fill in a form faster (why type when you can click?!). For those developers, we’re now pleased to offer address-level reverse geocoding support to both our HTTP service and the GClientGeocoder class. To make it super easy to use, the interface for reverse geocoding is nearly the same as forward geocoding – the only difference is sending in a lat/lng instead of an address.

See related stories below for other reverse geocoding solutions, including Microsoft’s Virtual Earth and a previous reverse geocoding solution using the Google Maps API.