Recent Posts

NovAtel Announces SPAN-SE

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Canal Geomatics writes “NovAtel, an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of precise positioning technology, announced last month its new flagship GNSS + INS receiver, the SPAN-SE. Designed for precision applications, NovAtel SPAN-SE enhances the powerful OEMV receiver with features that are critical to precision GNSS/INS system integrators such as on-board data logging, Ethernet connectivity, wheel sensor input and scalability for future GNSS advances.”

First Global Carbon Dioxide Map Released

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Spatial Sustain offers a short interesting entry on the first global carbon dioxide map. From the entry: “Last week NASA released the first global carbon dioxide map that’s ever been produced. […] AIRS creates three-dimensional maps of air and surface temperature, water vapor and cloud properties using infrared technology. The instrument uses 2,378 spectral channels for a resolution that’s 100 times better than previous instruments. The satellite accurately maps trace greenhouse gases such as ozone, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane.

Some related stories copied below.

San Francisco Solar Map

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The Vector One blog brings us news about this new map. Head on over there to get the link to the map and more information. Here is their summary :“Sustainable Energy Delivery blog reports on the San Francisco Solar Map, a city project in cooperation with CH2M Hill to raise awareness and help people to shift toward solar installations. The goal of the project is 10,000 installations by 2012. The Solar Map includes aerial imagery parcel data and other sources of information, all working on your favorite virtual globe.’

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A 3D Curve Sketching System For Tablets

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There is currently a discussion on Slashdot which introduces us to a novel way to create 3D models. Don’t know if you can sketch a building this way, but here is the article summary from Slashdot : “The Dynamic Graphics Project of the University of Toronto has released a pretty nifty 3D curve sketching system. Apart from the large drawing area, the tablet software looks very intuitive to artists. From the site: ‘The system coherently integrates existing techniques of sketch-based interaction with a number of novel and enhanced features. Novel contributions of the system include automatic view rotation to improve curve sketchability, an axis widget for sketch surface selection, and implicitly inferred changes between sketching techniques. We also improve on a number of existing ideas such as a virtual sketchbook, simplified 2D and 3D view navigation, multi-stroke NURBS curve creation, and a cohesive gesture vocabulary.'”

3D Printing On Demand

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We’ve previously reported on 3D printing, but slashdot has a discussion currently going on this. Here is their summary :
“The Netherlands based company Shapeways is beta testing a new service allowing people to print three-dimensional models. Customers can upload designs or use a creation tool hosted at the Shapeways website, then order a printed model of their designs for less than $3 per square centimeter. The printed items are shipped to the customer in ten days or less, bringing 3D printing to consumers and not just companies large enough to afford their own printers.”