Recent Posts

Montreal on Google Transit and the Google Transit Feed Specification

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Google announced that the Montreal area is now added to Google Transit. Montreal, Canada being the place where I live and work at the moment, and being a user of public transport, this is obviously a welcomed addition. The main interesting element to me is Google managed to have many different transport organizations of that urban area to work together to share their routes using the common GTFS feed format.

From my inbox, this Fagstein blog entry provides additional information on Montreal transit networks.

See also related stories below.

Earth Globes Manufacturing

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Several geoblogs mentioned it, here’s an interesting 4:43 minutes video about manufacturing Earth globes, the real tangible ones, not the virtual ones we’re now so accustomed to.

Secondlight, Microsoft’s New Surface Prototype

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Slashdot currently has a discussion running on this. It has mapping implications as mentioned in the summary, so check out the article and watch the video. Here is the Slashdot summary : “Microsoft has literally added another dimension to its touchscreen table technology Surface. The new table projects an image through the table itself, so that any translucent material (such as tracing paper or perspex) held above the Surface screen displays a different image to what you see on the table’s display. This means you can have a satellite image of a town on the table, and have the street names projected on to a piece of paper that the user holds above the map. Or you could have a photo of a car, with the tracing paper displaying images of its innards.”

New Geovisualization: Microsoft Single View Platform

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All Points Blog have an interesting entry on a new Microsoft geovisualization platform named the Microsoft Single View Platform.

From the entry: “Microsoft SVP is an open, industry standards–based technology that provides a highly integrated foundation for a variety of data visualization solutions in the area of business intelligence, information sharing, work flow and business processes, project management and systems center. […] The Microsoft SVP foundation architecture is based on the following core technologies:

Microsoft Virtual Earth,
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007; Exchange Server; Office Communications Server,
Microsoft SQL Server,
Windows Server

Other Microsoft geostories.

User Review of Maptitude 5.0 for Great Britain

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After previous reviews last April, DM offers a fresh review named Maptitude 5.0 for Great Britain: One User’s Perspective.

From this review: “Initially I was a skeptic. When first shown the product, I also had access to several of the market leaders in GIS (I still do). “Why,” I wondered, “would I need another?” But Maptitude won me over with its ease of use, its stability when processing large data sets and its ability to handle non-native file formats, which now include various database and spreadsheet formats, image support, the ability to handle files from other GIS software, some compressed file formats and Ordnance Survey’s NTF. Maptitude 5.0 for Great Britain is now in its fifth year of existence.